• Nurse Tori

51 NURSE JOBS TO CONSIDER!

Updated: Nov 24

Nurses are more than scrubs & stethoscopes. And for those of us in the field, let's face it, BURNOUT IS REAL!

There are so many roles nurses may take on.

This is the beauty of Nursing.


Along with the medical field in general, the role of a nurse underwent significant changes over the course of the 20th century. The nursing field professionalized and the duties of a nurse went from (essentially a limited skilled service) to a highly educated qualified, & licensed profession. Over that time, administering medications, checking vital signs, and simply following the directions of the doctor in charge shifted to collecting raw data, interpreting observations, and making diagnoses and treatment plans. And honestly, the profession continues to rise its standards & increase its roles in various patient populations.


The most common thing I am seeing as an 8 year veteran Nurse is, BURNOUT. That deep sense of... burnt to your soul, crispy FRIED, numb & frustrated nurse sensation. That feeling of dread going into work, the impending doom & thinking, "is this really what I want to do the REST of my life?" The expectations at the bedside are rising. Organizations are increasing their nurse standards with higher degrees, certifications, research, education, furthering nurse practice, keeping up with patient & family demands etc.


While these are all essential, YES, they can cause burnout.

So what do you do?


YOU SHIFT! You research, spruce up the portfolio, and dig deep to really find out what works for YOU! I actually find it quite FREEING to know there are so many options out there. The nurse role is expanding by leaps and bounds. Let's face it, the ONE thing everyone wants at the end of the day, is their health. And our holistic approach to learning the body can be used in SOO many ways. So much so, I am now platforming it on my Podcast! Here is a complied list (with Links to resources for you to check out!) In addition, check out my Podcast, filled with Nurses from all walks of life & specialties.

51 ROLES A NURSE CAN CONSIDER!


We always talk about “the beauty of nursing” but I think we forget really how amazing it is. This is a post I did a while back and I’m bringing it back for Nurses are more than scrubs & stethoscopes. There are so many roles nurses may take on. If you are in a rut and need some INSP, I have curated a lengthy list of Nursing Jobs just for you!

51 NURSE JOBS or ROLES TO CONSIDER!


1. Staff Nurse (ICU, CVICU, PICU, L&D, Peds, OR, ER, Surgical, Oncology, NICU, Clinic, etc)

2. Nurse Entrepreneurs

Nurse entrepreneurs apply their nursing backgrounds and professional experiences to create businesses in the health care industry. Much like other entrepreneurs, they identify a need in the marketplace and conceptualize and build a business that fills that need. They may offer independent nursing services, such as patient care or consulting, or create and sell medical devices or home health care products. Others take on writing or coaching roles.

3. Transcultural Nurse

Transcultural nursing is a distinct nursing specialty which focuses on global cultures and comparative cultural caring, health, and nursing phenomena. The transcultural nurse looks to respond to the imperative for developing a global perspective within the nursing field in an increasingly globalized world of interdependent and interconnected nations and individuals.


4. Health Policy Nurse

Nurses have worked to influence healthcare laws and policies ever since the field of nursing began. Therefore, those who are interested in ways to create and facilitate change in healthcare may wish to pursue a rewarding career as a Health Policy Nurse. Health policy nurses work to review and revise healthcare laws, policies, and regulations.

5. Fertility Nurse

Fertility nurses help facilitate the egg donation process, providing support and guidance to both couples and the matched donors. Reproductive nurses work with a team of specialized healthcare professionals in fertility clinics, obstetric/gynecology offices, or egg donor centers.

6. Substance Abuse Nurse

A substance abuse nurse receives training both in general medicine and mental health, as handling patients suffering from substance abuse requires knowledge of both disciplines. Nurses will be needed to provide emotional support not just for their patients, but also for patients' family members and loved ones, who are also affected and suffering.

7. Genetic Nurse

A genetics nurse is an RN with additional training and education in genetics. Genetic nurses care for patients who are at risk for, or are affected by, diseases with a genetic component including cancer, heart disease, diabetes, and Alzheimer's disease among others. In addition to providing direct patient care, genetics nurses also perform risk assessments, analyze the results and counsel patients on the ongoing management of their conditions or conditions they may be at risk for.

8. Pharmaceutical Research Nurse

The Clinical Research Nurse - BSN is a Registered Nurse (RN) who works collaboratively with physicians, Clinical Research Associates (CRA) and pharmacists to coordinate care for an assigned population of patients who are enrolled in to IRB clinical research trials. The RN assists in the assessment, management and coordination of care across the continuum of care (outpatient, inpatient and home) including triage of phone calls and proactive patient communication. The Clinical Research Nurse - BSN serves to educate patients and families on the clinical trial treatments and required testing.

9. Occupational Health Nurse

Occupational health nursing is the specialty practice of delivering health and safety programs and services to employees, worker populations, and association groups. Sometimes occupational health nurses are referred to as occupational and environmental health nurses (OHNs). Occupational health nurses focus on the promotion and re-establishment of health, the prevention of ailment and injury, and protecting workers from occupation-related and environmental hazards.

10. Nurse Health Coach

Nurse coaches use a variety of health-promoting and evidence-based strategies to achieve growth, overall health, and well-being of their patients.

11. Informatics Nurse Specialist

An informatics nurse specialist is someone at the forefront of changing technology in the medical world. Often, they act as liaisons between health care providers and technology people in order to allow better decisions to be made based on more accurate data. The paper records systems that have been used by healthcare providers for more than a century are quickly coming to an end.

12. Telemedicine Nurse

Fifty years ago, it was common for doctors to make home visits to care for their patients. Fast-forward to today when home visits aren’t common anymore, but an ill patient can still receive medical treatment from the comfort of his or her own home virtually thanks to telemedicine. Health care has come a long way since the days of personalized home visits from physicians. The advancement of telemedicine has drastically changed the delivery of health care.

14. Infusion therapy Nurse

Infusion nurses have a great deal of responsibility ensuring patients receive safe, quality infusion care. The infusion nurse is an integral member of the health care team and collaborates with physicians, physician assistants, nurse practitioners, and pharmacists to ensure the vascular access device and treatment used are best suited to the patient’s needs.

15. Military, Navy, Air Force Nurse

The Nurse Corps has five Reserve components and, although similar, each branch has its own commitment requirements:

  1. Army Reserve

  2. Navy Reserve

  3. Air force Reserve

  4. Air National Guard

  5. Army National Guard

16. Nurse Executive

A nurse executive often holds the most senior nursing position in their place of employment, and can even hold a title such as Director of Nursing. In order to be an effective nurse executive, RNs must clearly and effectively communicate with their nursing staff to help provide the best patient care possible.

17. Nurse Consultant

Nurse consultants are nurses who usually identify problems and develop solutions. The business is usually operated from a home office and reports are sent to the customer. Some work may be required at the customer’s facility. The consultant must be a registered nurse.


18. Aesthetic Nurse

➢ A Beauty Nurse is not a generic career title; it is something you create yourself. You first become a Registered Nurse and then entered into the Aesthetic Industry.

➢ A RN doing injections can have many titles such as the following: Aesthetic Nurse, Cosmetic Nurse, Nurse Injector, Cosmetic Nurse Injector, Advanced Nurse Injector etc. This area of work is so grey.  There is no official title for this career!

➢ Being a nurse is far from glamorous; even a nurse in the aesthetic industry. I may not be coming off of 20-hour shifts caked in filth like I did in my early days as a RN, but being an injector is still really hard work.


19. Insurance Consulting RN

Legal nurse consultants (LNCs) provide assistance to a variety of professionals in law firms, government offices, and insurance companies. A legal nurse consultant has training as a registered nurse, and through that strong educational and experiential background, provides an important service related to analyzing health care facts, issues, and outcomes for those in the legal and healthcare professions.


20. Quality Management RN

A quality management position requires interaction/collaboration with individuals in numerous health care disciplines. All work together to solve problems affecting quality of care. You would be involved in data collection, seeking solutions to problems, collaboration, and whatever else the job entails. Every job has its own set of stressors; it is all relative. The only way to find about this job would be to apply for it. If you meet their qualifications, go for an interview and ASK many questions.


21. Correctional Nurse

Correctional Nursing is a unique specialty.  It is a wonderful mix of public health, community health, occupational health, ambulatory care, emergency medicine and school nursing.  The standards of Correctional Nursing published by the American Nursing Association state that nurses working in corrections often care for individuals with complex health conditions or those with multiple health issues.  Correctional nursing activities include patient assessment, medication administration, treatments and evaluation of their effects, crisis intervention, patient education and patient advocacy. ~ANA, 2013


22. Postpartum Nurse

The postpartum or mother-baby nurse is tasked with caring for both mother and newborn baby once a birth has taken place. This nurse utilizes a strong set of skills to recognize and act upon postpartum emergencies for both patients. The postpartum nurse appreciates a busy working environment and the challenge of quickly detecting complications from childbirth. A large part of this nurse's job is teaching new mothers how to properly care for herself as well as her newborn after the delivery. Lactation nurses are often postpartum nurses who have become certified.


23. Cruise Ship Nurse

Cruise ships are pretty much small cities floating in the water with the average cruise ship holding around 3,000 guests, not counting the crew that works on the ship full-time. For nurses that want to escape busy ERs and clinics, working on a cruise ship could be a dream job.


24. Forensic Nurse Consultant

Forensic nurses specialize in caring for patients who are the victims of trauma, violence, and abuse. They have a foundation in the criminal justice system as well as nursing. They are on the front lines when victims of crimes need help the most, providing sensitive, compassionate care while meticulously collecting relevant evidence that may be needed later in court. Some forensic nurses choose to specialize in sexual assault/trauma by becoming certified as Sexual Assault Nurse Examiners (SANE).


25. Logistics Specialist

Logistics management specialists, because of their affiliation with the federal government, usually are paid good wages and enjoy competitive benefits. As with other government jobs, a measure of security is associated with the career. The work of a logistics management specialist is often time-sensitive and fast-paced, which can render it stressful. Logisticians usually work full-time during regular business hours; those that do work internationally may have more irregular hours to accommodate time changes with other nations.


26. Emergency Flight & Transport Nurse

A flight nurse is a registered nurse who specialises in the field of providing comprehensive pre-hospital, emergency critical care, and hospital care to a vast scope of patients. The care of these patients is generally during aeromedical evacuation or rescue operations aboard helicopters, propeller aircraft or jet aircraft. Check out the Podcast, featuring Samantha Manassero, Episode #7 For all things Emergency Flight & Transport Nurse, FIRST HAND!


27. Triage Nurse

A triage nurse is a clinical health care professional who assesses a patient to evaluate their symptoms. Triage nurses can work in a variety of settings, including remotely. If you are thinking about studying for a career in the nursing profession, you should consider the steps necessary to become a triage nurse.


28. Pain Management Nurse

Pain management nurses are registered nurses who specialize in the care of patients with chronic, sometimes debilitating pain. They are experts on pain management interventions and techniques.


29. Transplant Coordinator

Transplant Nurse Coordinator provides planning and coordination of all facets of clinical care for potential and actual transplant candidates and recipients. Manages referral, evaluation, and pre-transplant data for transplant patients and coordinates the clinical management of post-transplant patients.


30. Psychiatric Mental Health

Psychiatric nursing or mental health nursing is the appointed position of a nurse that specialises in mental health, and cares for people of all ages experiencing mental illnesses or distress. These include: schizophrenia, schizoaffective disorder, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, personality disorders, eating disorders, suicidal thoughts, psychosis, paranoia, and self-harm.


31. Infectious Control Nurse

Sometimes referred to as Infection Control Specialists or Nurse Infection Preventionists, Infection Control Nurses specialize in preventing, containing, and treating infectious diseases caused by agents like bacteria, parasites, viruses, and fungus. This requires exceedingly advanced skills and a vast knowledge base. Infection control nurses must have an intimate understanding of anatomy and physiology, epidemiology, as well as extensive knowledge regarding the infectious disease process and infection prevention techniques.


32. Health Administration Nurse

Healthcare administration. Healthcare administrators are more concerned with day-to-day operations. An administrator's focus is on daily staff management and administrative procedures within a department. Healthcare administrators usually report to healthcare managers, and work within individual departments as supervisors or manager support.

33. Disaster Management


34. Certified Nurse Midwife

A midwife is a person who has successfully completed a midwifery education programme that is recognised in the country where it is located and that is based on the ICM Essential Competencies for Basic Midwifery Practice and the framework of the ICM Global Standards for Midwifery Education; who has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery and use the title ‘midwife’; and who demonstrates competency in the practice of midwifery.


35. Plastic Surgery Nurse

The term plastic surgery nurse falls under an umbrella that's used to refer to aesthetic nurses and reconstructive surgery nurses. Although aesthetic nurses and reconstructive surgery nurses are both plastic surgery nurses, the two should be distinguished from one another. Reconstructive surgery nurses specialize is nursing care in the surgical specialty that involves the reconstruction or restoration of a patient's body.


36. Public Health Nurse

The American Public Health Association defines public health nursing as, "the practice of promoting and protecting the health of populations using knowledge from nursing, social, and public health sciences". By working together, nurses can make a great impact on public health as a whole. The American Nurses Association (ANA) builds on individual nurse contributions to public health, by supporting policy, advocacy, and education at the highest levels. These areas of interest include, but are not limited to:

  • Immunizations;

  • Infection prevention;

  • Environmental health; and

  • Opioid crisis response.


37. Camp Nurse

Camp nurses serve a community, typically children or teens, in a camp environment. This can include summer camps or other camps that last from days to weeks to even months at a time, but are usually temporary. These camps house children, staff, and administrators in a setting that may be in the wilderness or some distance from a hospital or health clinic, so camp nurses are crucial for these populations.


38. Nurse Practitioner (FNP, PNP, CRNA, CGNP, PMHNP, AGPCNP etc)

Nurse practitioners (NPs) practice in nearly every health care setting including clinics, hospitals, Veterans Affairs and Indian Health Care facilities, emergency rooms, urgent care sites, private physician or NP practices (both managed and owned by NPs), nursing homes, schools, colleges, retail clinics, public health departments, nurse managed clinics, homeless clinics, etc.


39. Lactation Specialist (IBCLC) Nurse

Registered nurses, who are also CLCs or IBCLCs, can earn advanced certification in lactation management. The Advanced NurseLactation Consultant possesses the insight, knowledge, and skills essential to the development and implementation of management strategies for complex problems related to breastfeeding and human lactation.


40. Hospice Nurse

A hospice nurse cares for people who have been diagnosed with six months or less to live and have chosen hospice care at the end of life. As part of the hospice philosophy of care, a hospice nurse focuses on comfort and quality of life. They provide individualized care based on each person’s unique needs.


41. Transplant Coordinator

Transplant Nurse Coordinator provides planning and coordination of all facets of clinical care for potential and actual transplant candidates and recipients. Manages referral, evaluation, and pre-transplant data for transplant patients and coordinates the clinical management of post-transplant patients.


42. Travel Nurse

Travel nurses are registered nurses who work in short-term roles at hospitals, clinics, and other healthcare facilities around the world. Travel nurses help fill gaps in areas where there are nursing shortages. They are employed by an independent nursing staffing agency instead of a single hospital.


43. Vascular access nurse

The Vascular Access Board Certification (VA-BC™) is designed for clinical professionals to include but not limited to; MD’s, PA’s, NP’s, RN’s, LPN/LVN’s, RT’s, RRT’s, Infection Control, Educators, EMS professionals, that actively work in the field of vascular access. Having a thorough and sound foundation of the knowledge and skills required for competent practice in vascular access is essential. Knowledge can be obtained through work experiences and independent learning, as well as through formal educational programs. These components afford the candidate exposure and professional development and education in the vascular access specialty.


44. Obstetrics Nurse

An obstetric nurse might be known by many names, including OB nurses, OB/GYN nurses, and perinatal nurses. They specialize in the field of obstetrics or the branch of medicine that focuses on women and fetus during pregnancy and childbirth. These specialty nurses help care for pregnant women and their little ones during and after pregnancy and delivery. At times, obstetric nurses will also help counsel and advise women who are trying to get pregnant.


45. Nurse Concierge (Post-Op home care)

Concierge nursing services provide patients personalized care without them having to visit a doctor or hospital. These services include consultation on medical issues, home health services after surgery and post-op travel care.


While most associate concierge nursing services with in home care, non-emergency medical transport companies like Flying Angels provide medical travel with a registered nurse which makes travel safer and easier. With bedside to bedside care, clients and their families have peace of mind while they travel with a flight nurse throughout their journey.


46. Self-Employed Nurse Mentor

Nurse entrepreneurs use their professional nursing experience and education to start their own business in the healthcare industry. Businesses established by nurse entrepreneurs may include developing and selling a home health product or medical device, or offering independent nursing services, such as patient care, nursing education, home health and/or consulting services. A nursing career path that offers independence and autonomy, becoming a nurse entrepreneur requires creativity, hard work and strong business skills.


47. Nurse Blogger or Content Creator side gig


49. Surgical First Assistant Nurse

A Surgical First Assistant is usually the  surgical assistant with the highest level of expertise and training. While first assistants are expected to perform different tasks at different medical locations, they are generally trained and certified to perform and be proficient in the following tasks among others:

  • Cauterizing wounds and vessels

  • Packing sponges in body

  • Positioning patient to maintain circulation and access for surgeon

  • Placing clamps and sutures

  • Closing skin with adhesives, sutures or staples etc.

  • Applying direct pressure on veins and tissue

  • Performing or aiding in patient suction, drainage and irrigation

  • Hemostasis: The stopping of excess bleeding and blood flow

  • Immobilizing patients on the operating table


49. Clinical Editor

Scholarly journals, databases, and publishers hire advanced practice nurses to write, edit, and peer-review their content. As an expert in his or her specialty, the nurse practitioner editor is responsible for developing and maintaining proprietary clinical content as well as critically appraising the work of others. Generally these positions require a doctorate degree such as the Doctor of Nursing Practice or Doctor of Philosophy in Nursing. Consider looking at companies like Wolters KluwerEBSCOSpringer Publishing, and Jones & Bartlet.


50. Nursing Educator Corrdinator

A nurse care coordinator is a nurse who specializes in organizing patient care and treatments by incorporating all members in the care team. They usually focus on patients with specific diagnoses such as diabetes, asthma, heart failure, etc. Care coordination helps prevent fragmented care and helps patients seamlessly transition from one care area to another. In today's complicated world of healthcare, patients need someone to help navigate them throughout the care continuum. Nurse care coordinators help to:

  • Improve patient care outcomes

  • Improve access to care

  • Decrease healthcare cost

  • Prevent hospital readmissions

  • Promote continuity of care


51. Advanced Practice Nurse (Nurse Practitioner, CRNA, Certified Nurse Midwife)

Nurse anesthetists, nurse midwives, and nurse practitioners, also referred to as advanced practice registered nurses (APRNs), must have at least a master's degree in their specialty role. APRNs also must be licensed registered nurses in their state, pass a national certification exam, and have a state APRN license.


Types Of Nursing Jobs And Salaries: How They Relate


The Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) projects employment for registered nurses to grow by 15% between 2016-2026. A nursing career can provide personal growth, solid earnings, and an increasing level of responsibility as you progress through your career.


To really thrive, many RNs earn additional certifications, go for an advanced degree, and specialize in one particular area of nursing. This increases earning potential by helping them qualify for positions at more prestigious hospitals. Some advanced practice RNs can even open their own clinics.


The savvy nurse will fully engage in the job search process, which can include making sure all of the tools in his or her nursing career toolbox are ready to be used at a moment’s notice.  


If you approach the job search process with an open mind and a sense of curiosity and adventure, there’s much to learn about both yourself and the nursing profession along the way.  


These amazing opportunities and so much more! I hope you enjoyed this read and found it helpful. I know how thankful I am for this amazing profession and love to share it with you!


Tori's Tips on NICU NURSE 101:

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Tori Meskin BSN RNC-NIC has been a clinician since 2012, works in acute care/inpatient NICU & Pediatric settings in southern California. She is a blogger, podcaster, NICU & Pediatric Critical Care RN, MSN student, a Barco Uniforms Ambassador, and Brave beginnings affiliate. Find her at www.tipsfromtori.com or info@tipsfromtori.com


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